Well for starters, I personally have never participated in any Valentine’s Day festivities.

I swear, in my head, I just heard all of you “Aw”.

I appreciate your sympathy or empathy, whichever one applies; but, don’t worry, it is O.K!

I’m only twenty-one and I will have plenty of opportunities in the future to take my significant other, whoever you are, out for a night on the town.

For now, I am perfectly fine with celebrating Valentine’s day by myself with an alcoholic beverage in-hand accompanied with Baltimore’s finest chicken wings.

Shameless plug: Shout out to the Local Fry on 21 East Cross Street.

So, what does Valentine’s Day look like for single people?

I’m going to attempt to break it down for you.

Valentine’s Day is one of the only days out of the 365 that women are EXPECTED to be catered to.

Unless it’s your birthday, wedding anniversary, or you’re a mom.

If you’re a mother and married, you’re lucky because you get three, maybe four days dedicated to you where you are showered with affection and thoughtful gifts.

Not saying that men can’t go above and beyond and do thoughtful and “cute” things for their significant other on any given day but, I am not speaking to those who are ten plus years into their marriage; and, this is 2017.

Let’s be realistic here.

If you’re in college right now or if you have graduated within the past two years, it feels like 95% of the people you know are single.

Don’t quote me on that statistic, but single people don’t necessarily do “cute” things.

Or am I speaking for myself here?

Ya’ll the author ain’t saying this exactly, but honestly tho?.. Photo Credit: Satish Krishnamurthy/ Flickr (CC By 2.0)

There are a few types of single people on Valentine’s Day.

Those who don’t care (raises hand), the hopeless romantics who are pressed to find a Valentine for the day, those who troll their “taken” friends on social media, and those who are bitter that they aren’t being catered to.

We all know at least one person who belongs to one of those categories.

Now, I don’t know about you and your acquaintances but oddly enough, my lady friends are mainly those who occupy the categories.

Single men don’t usually make a big fuss about Valentine’s Day, or at least the single men that I know.

For the guys, being single on Valentine’s Day means last week’s paycheck can stay in your pocket because you aren’t paying for steak dinners, teddy bears, and chocolate covered strawberries.

I don’t know any single young man in his right mind who would be angry or bitter on Valentine’s Day.

Ladies, thank the double standard for this one.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying that we’re heartless.

I’m simply saying that single men don’t get too emotionally wrapped up in Valentine’s Day if we don’t have to.

Now, sending a bouquet of flowers, or a thoughtful card, or a bottle of champagne and box of chocolates to someone in attempt to woo is perfectly fine.

In fact, it’s normal for that to happen.

According to History.com, more than half of this country’s population partake in Valentine’s Day by “sending greeting cards or flowers, giving candy or other gifts, enjoying romantic dinners, or all three”.

So, it’s O.K. to participate in Valentine’s Day; but if you’re single and you’re attempting to sweep a young lady, or young man, off his or her feet with a barrage of gifts and thoughtful messages be prepared for the imminent rejection in the following days.

It is extremely flattering to be catered to on a day that is dedicated to love and romance but once that day is over and love is no longer lingering in the air, be prepared for an “It’s not you, it’s me” text message.

Love can be funny.

You just have to be strong and willing to laugh sometimes.

And when that doesn’t work, just eat a bunch of french fries.

RISE NEWS is a grassroots journalism news organization that is working to change the way young people become informed and engaged in the world. You can write for us.

Cover Photo Credit: Tom Hilton/ Flickr (CC By 2.0)

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Marshall T. Glaze is a young, creatively spunky writer out of Baltimore, Maryland. He's been published in Skelter, The University of Baltimore’s literary magazine. He is a jack of all trades as he is talented in areas more than one. Marshall is well versed in the realms of fiction, poetry, theater, radio, and the culinary arts.

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