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Inside Miami’s Only Rastafarian Church

What’s News In This Story?


 

 

–Priest Douggie Smith and his team at the First Rastafari Church and Cultural Center of Florida are doing something unique. 

They are trying to get local Rastafari out of the shadows and into the center of the larger community. 

-Priest Douggie: “We didn’t create a space for Rastafari alone we created a space for the community so Rastafari and the community can interact together and build our community in a positive way.” 

-Priest Douggie’s message and style has attracted some interesting non Rastafari people to his new center for cultural events.

According to Priest Douggie, there is a large Rastafari community in South Florida, but they are scattered around the region. 

From 1993 to 2007, there was a Rastafari church in Miami but it was forced to close during the recession. 

-From that time to the opening of the new center, local Rastafari had to meet at homes and in parks to worship with each other.

 

Miami’s Waterkeeper Is Seriously Worried About The Future Of The City’s Waterways

What’s News In This Story?


 

Miami Waterkeeper Rachel Silverstein has built her non-profit into a legit force in the South Florida political and legal world.

-They’ve entered the scene at the perfect time to give our waters a fighting chance.

-From pollution to ecosystem crushing algae blooms to sea level rise and a nuclear power plant that could end up being swallowed by the sea- there’s a lot at stake right now.

Rachel Silverstein is the waterkeeper and executive director for Miami Waterkeeper.

Silverstein leads a team of five lawyers and scientists who advocate for ecological protections and smart public policy through advocacy and scientific research. 

They also sue polluters. And they threaten people who are trashing Miami’s waters with lawsuits. They do that a lot.

In 2014, Miami Waterkeeper sued Miami-Dade county to protect coral reefs that were impacted by the Port Miami dredging project. The county settled with Miami Waterkeeper and paid over $400,000 to relocate the corals to a University of Miami lab.

FPL’s Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant.

Silverstein is concerned about the future of FPL’s Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant. She thinks that the plant will be submerged by the impacts of sea level rise by 2040. FPL wants to continue to use the site until at least 2052

Meet The Three Frenchmen Who Are Taking Over Miami’s Culinary Scene

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–All the rage in North Miami is Cafe Creme, a French restaurant that serves breakfast, lunch and dinner. It’s the kind of place that you wouldn’t dream to find in this working class Miami suburb a few years ago.

-Cafe Creme co-founder Cory Finot and his partner Claude Postel were lured to North Miami by some grant money from the city’s community redevelopment agency.

-While additional future locations for Cafe Creme are in development, the three Frenchmen have embarked on another ambitious venture. 

-In mid 2018, they opened Sixty10, an old school place that serves classic French chicken dishes in a unpretentious way. 

-Claude owns the land it sits on in the heart of Little Haiti and the Frenchmen are betting that it becomes the Wynwood Walls of the neighborhood as it continues to experience gentrification. 

-If you think that sounds like a pipe dream, don’t be so hasty. Cory was mentored by the man who put Wynwood on the map, the late Miami developer Tony Goldman. 

 **IF YOU GO: 

Cafe Creme, North Miami- 750 NE 125th St, North Miami, FL 33161

Cafe Creme, Buena Vista- 5010 NE 2nd Ave, Miami, Fl 33137

Sixty10- 6010 NE 2nd Ave, Miami, FL 33137

——Here’s Something Completely Different: ——

Newly Reopened To The Public, Miami’s Iconic Freedom Tower Has Positioned Itself As An Ideas Hub

RISE NEWS is South Florida’s digital TV news network. Sign up for our awesome email newsletter to make sure you never miss a story!

Have a news tip about this topic or something completely different? Send it to editor@risenews.net.

Newly Reopened To The Public, Miami’s Iconic Freedom Tower Has Positioned Itself As An Ideas Hub

What’s News In This Story?


 

–The Freedom Tower (600, Biscayne Boulevard) is Miami’s most historic landmark.

-Known as the Ellis Island of the South, the tower recently reopened to the public with a slew of new features.

-And with the changes, the facility is poised to be a center of action for those who want to move the Magic City forward.

–The additions to the museum include the Kislak Center- a 2,600 square foot space that includes books, manuscripts, maps, and other artifacts from both before and after Christopher Columbus’ journey to the new world. 

The museum also features the Cuban Legacy Gallery, a space that looks at the impact of Cuban’s to South Florida’s history. 

–The museum is trying to position itself as a place where Miami can come to learn about its past while also brainstorming ideas for its future. 

The museum also features the Cuban Legacy Gallery, a space that looks at the impact of Cuban’s to South Florida’s history. 

–Opened in 1926 as the original home for The Miami News, the tower became iconic after it was pressed into service as the processing center for Cuban refugees who were fleeing the rise of the Castro regime.

The building has been owned by Miami-Dade College since 2005 and in recent years the offices for the Miami Film Festival and the Miami Book Fair were moved into the tower. The building was previously owned by a number of private owners, including the Mas family, who donated it to MDC. 

 

**IF YOU GO: Open 1-6 p.m. Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Sundays; and 1-8 p.m. Saturdays.

The Museum of Art and Design at Miami Dade College- Freedom Tower (600, Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, 33132)

Admission: $12 general, $8 senior and military, $5 students, children under 12 enter free. MDC students, faculty and staff enter free. Ticketed events vary in price.

——Here’s Something Completely Different: ——

The TV Weatherman Who Is Trying To Save Miami From Drowning

RISE NEWS is South Florida’s digital TV news network. Sign up for our awesome email newsletter to make sure you never miss a story!

Have a news tip about this topic or something completely different? Send it to editor@risenews.net.

Miami Vignette: The Boys Who Gave Their Library Their Favorite Stuffed Animal

Miami Vignettes are very short stories about interesting aspects of life in South Florida that RISE NEWS finds in the community while reporting on other things. Sometimes little stories can have a big impact. Share yours with us: editor@risenews.net. Also be sure to sign up for our newsletter so you never miss our most important Miami stories.  

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6 year old Milan and 3 year old Sascha Saravia love their huge stuffed Woolly Mammoth.

They were given it and another huge toy dinosaur as a gift from a family friend a few years ago.

But they decided to give it away to one of their favorite places, Brockway Memorial Library in Miami Shores so that other kids can enjoy seeing it too.

Brenda Holsing, the Youth Services Librarian at Brockway said that the mammoth has been a hit with the scores of children who see it each day since it was donated a few months ago.

The mammoth that the Saravia boys donated to Brockway Memorial Library in Miami Shores.

Their dad Adrian Saravia said that the decision to give away the mammoth was a joint venture between the two boys.

“They visit the library at least three times a week and it’s a place that they enjoy a lot,” Adrian said. “And it just seemed like a nice thing to share with other kids.”

The boys are in the library’s summer camp program and also attend a monthly science program there during the regular school year.

From left to right: Adrian Saravia and his two sons Sascha and Milan on the wholly mammoth they donated to Brockway Memorial Library in Miami Shores.

So they spend a lot of time in the small, community run library.

“We feel very safe and comfortable and feel that they’re in a nice environment where they can meet people in the community,” Adrian said. “We’re very lucky to have a library so close and to have such a good group of people who care for the kids.”

Adrian said that the boys intend to eventually donate their giant toy brontosaurus to the library too.

The mammoth is now found on top of a book shelf opposite a longtime Brockway Library resident, the dragon.

 

——Here’s Something Completely Different: ——

The TV Weatherman Who Is Trying To Save Miami From Drowning

RISE NEWS is South Florida’s digital TV news network. Sign up for our awesome email newsletter to make sure you never miss a story!

Have a news tip about this topic or something completely different? Send it to editor@risenews.net.

Miami Vignette: The Coconut Capitalist

Miami Vignettes are very short stories about interesting aspects of life in South Florida that RISE NEWS finds in the community while reporting on other things. Sometimes little stories can have a big impact. Share yours with us: editor@risenews.net. Also be sure to sign up for our newsletter so you never miss our most important Miami stories.  

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COCONUT CAPITALISM – Isidro Carrazana is an 80 year old man who works 7 days a week cutting down coconuts from people’s properties with a 30 foot pole around the Miami area.

For the record, yes he does ask for permission first from the homeowner.

He is from Cuba and moved to South Florida 27 years ago.

He lives near North Shore Hospital and sells his coconuts to various vendors around town.

He told us that he makes $50 to $75 a day.

The work certainly hasn’t made him rich, but it has allowed him to pursue the American dream.

——Here’s Something Completely Different: ——

The TV Weatherman Who Is Trying To Save Miami From Drowning

RISE NEWS is South Florida’s digital TV news network. Sign up for our awesome email newsletter to make sure you never miss a story!

Have a news tip about this topic or something completely different? Send it to editor@risenews.net.

Lower East Coast Is Bringing Miami’s Hipsters And Zine Fans To Allapattah

What’s News In This Story?


 

–Lower East Coast (3418 NW 7th Ave, Miami) is a small storefront that features zines and has a hipster feel.

-It’s one of those independent places that Miami doesn’t seem to have enough of.

–Founded by longtime friends and coworkers Steven Sanz and Rees Escobar, Lower East Coast is starting to get some buzz in the Miami artsy scene. 

–It also serves as a pop up venue for musicians that Lower East Coast Management represents, and others. 

–The shop is one of the anchors to a bunch of recent activity  in the Allapattah area. 

The full story: 

Lower East Coast is a small hipster shop that specializes in selling local zines, independent magazines and local apparel brands that are a bit obscure and weird.

It’s also something that co-founders Steven Sanz and Rees Escobar say that they have to do for Miami.

“We’ve been friends for a long time and we’ve been talking about doing something for Miami and this is what we landed on,” Sanz said in an interview with RISE NEWS.

The shop is an outgrowth of Lower East Coast Management, a local talent agency that manages the careers of artists like Denzel Curry and PSYCHIC MIRRORS.

Sanz and Escobar first met over 15 years ago and have similar interests.

They decided to launch a Lower East Coast storefront during last year’s Art Basel.

Since then, they have hosted a series of pop up events with artists they manage, and others.

They also sell street wear brands like the Miami based Stray Rats and their own original tees.

“Everything we do is small batch runs,” Sanz said. “What we do is very niche. When you work with the young art kids, the rarer it is, the cooler it is.”

The interior of the shop is an all-white industrial space with high ceilings. It also features wood bleachers were you can sit and read through the collection of rare zines.

Ultimately Sanz said that they are trying to create a sense of community in Miami with Lower East Coast.

“It’s inspired by places we visit in New York and London,” Sanz said. “We need more mom and pop shops here. It’s something we’re missing.”

***HOT TIP-  You can also watch World Cup games and hang at the store. Lower East Coast is also partnering with Hialeah thrift and consignment store, Ropa Vieja, to sell a variety of select 90’s soccer kits and a custom, limited edition World Cup T-shirt. 

**IF YOU GO: Open Wednesday through Sunday from 12 PM to 8 PM.

Lower East Coast (3418 NW 7th Ave, Miami, 33127)

——Here’s Something Completely Different: ——

The TV Weatherman Who Is Trying To Save Miami From Drowning

RISE NEWS is South Florida’s digital news network. Follow us on Facebook to make sure you never miss a story!

Have a news tip about this topic or something completely different? Send it to editor@risenews.net.

There Are Now Robot Floor Cleaners At Miami International Airport

What’s News In This Story?


–Miami International Airport (MIA) is now home to two autonomous cleaning vehicles that help polish the floors of busy Concourse D. 

According to a press release announcing the program, the robots are programmable, self-driving machines that are capable of running for more than four hours at a time.

-The robots can polish up to 80,000 square-feet of terminal floor space in four hours, which is roughly equivalent to two football fields.

–C&W Services runs facilities maintenance at MIA and they claim the robots will free up time for their 672 on-site cleaning professionals to focus on other projects. 

“We’re excited to launch these customer-oriented cleaning initiatives at MIA, which is one of C&W Services’ most prominent U.S. partners,” said Milagros Diaz, Operations Director for C&W Services at MIA said in a statement. 

–MIA sees over 44 million visitors each year and over 125,000 per day. It is one of the busiest airports in the United States. 

 

——Here’s Something Completely Different: ——

The TV Weatherman Who Is Trying To Save Miami From Drowning

RISE NEWS is South Florida’s digital news network. Follow us on Facebook to make sure you never miss a story!

Have a news tip about this topic or something completely different? Send it to editor@risenews.net.

The TV Weatherman Who Is Trying To Save Miami From Drowning

What’s News In This Story?


–John Morales is the chief meteorologist of NBC 6. He has also become one of the leading voices on climate change in South Florida. 

Morales is not afraid to use his platform to talk about climate change. 

–He frequently ties daily weather events to the broader context of what’s happening with climate change. Examples of this include the increasing frequency of “King Tides” in Miami and the increase in days that are good for mosquito development.

–Morales was born in upstate New York and raised in Puerto Rico. He studied atmospheric science at Cornell University and worked for the National Weather Service before getting into local tv in 1991.  

–He helped Miami’s Spanish speaking community get through Hurricane Andrew while he was at Univision- a job that he held until 2003. He then worked at Telemundo’s Miami affiliate for six years before scoring the chief meteorologist job at NBC 6 in 2009. 

 –Morales helped the American Meteorological Society increase its standards for broadcaster meteorologists- a move that some feel helped increase the number of tv weather people who believe that climate change is caused by humans. 

——Here’s Something Completely Different: ——

La Gringa For Miami: How A Special Election Is Changing Politics In South Florida

RISE NEWS is South Florida’s digital news network. Follow us on Facebook to make sure you never miss a story!

Have a news tip about this topic or something completely different? Send it to editor@risenews.net.

On Father’s Day This Group Made Miami’s Homeless Dads Smile

What’s News In This Story?


–Valencia Gunder and her non-profit organization Make The Homeless Smile made a special effort for Miami’s homeless dad’s on Father’s Day

–Gunder, who spent nearly a month homeless in 2009, started the organization in 2014 to give back. 

–Gunder said that she knows that Father’s Day can be sad for dads who live on the streets because many of them aren’t in touch with their children. 

–25 volunteers spent a few hours feeding over 100 people under the shadow of the Freedom Tower in downtown Miami. 

–An organization from Tallahassee called Coach’s Closet brought sneakers to give to the homeless and a barber was on hand to give out free haircuts. 

–Gunder and her group do this every third Sunday of the month at the same spot on NE 1st Ave and 6th St. 

 

——Here’s Something Completely Different: ——

La Gringa For Miami: How A Special Election Is Changing Politics In South Florida

RISE NEWS is South Florida’s digital news network. Follow us on Facebook to make sure you never miss a story!

Have a news tip about this topic or something completely different? Send it to editor@risenews.net.

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