Millennial Intelligencer: Brazil’s President Fights for Her Political Life

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff has been embroiled in scandal for several months, and the saga may come to a conclusion with her impeachment.

Large demonstrations have been ongoing in São Paulo calling for her impeachment, in order to compliment impeachment proceedings filed in Brazil’s Congress on December 2nd, though they are currently being blocked by the Supreme Court upon validation that the secret ballot to select the Congressional Committee was genuine.

These proceedings are the result of claims that President Rousseff violated budget laws to the benefit of her campaign for reelection in 2014. This is not the first suggestion that President Rousseff is corrupt.

Despite being cleared of wrongdoing in October, several members of her Worker’s Party have been implicated in the diversion of $2 billion over the course of a decade.

This has cast a shadow of doubt on her, and her party’s ability to govern.

Her position is made more so shaky due to the weak economic growth Brazil has been experiencing recently.

In the third quarter of 2015 Brazil’s economy shrank 1.7 percent. Current projections put Brazil on track to contract 3.6 percent by the end of 2015, and a further 2.3 percent in 2014. Foreign investments in Brazil have also plummeted.

Unemployment has also risen about 2 percent since this time last year.

All of these factors have contributed to a poor quality of life for the common Brazilian, which likely motivates the hostile reaction to President Rousseff’s continued tenure President of Brazil.

While it remains to be seen if the opposition will be able to muster enough votes to secure an impeachment, increased public pressure for the President’s impeachment only increase the likelihood of Rousseff ending her second term early.

Cover Photo Credit: Leonardo Veras/ Flickr (CC By 2.0)

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About the Author
"John Massey has a B.A. in political science and history from the University of Alabama. His primary interest is in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, but he also finds time to study French and political theory. "

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