North Miami

Beloved Captain Jim’s Was Just Reopened By A Member Of Miami’s Seafood Royal Family

What’s News In This Story?


Captain Jim’s has finally reopened after being closed for nearly a year.

The beloved restaurant and fish market has been delivering some of the best fresh seafood in South Florida since 1996. 

It was bought earlier this year by David Garcia. 

David is best known for running La Camaronera in Little Havana. He is from the famed Garcia family. 

-The family has a long history of fishing and being in the seafood business. They run Garcia’s, an historic seafood joint located on the Miami River. 

-David decided to keep Captain Jim’s name because of the near constant phone calls that he says he receives from old customers. 

-“Hopefully I meet everybody’s expectations,” David said in an interview. “I hope to be able to provide customers with fresh seafood and good service- make everybody happy and be a true, local, family restaurant.” 

IF YOU GO: 

Captain Jim’s

12950 W Dixie Hwy, North Miami, FL 33161

Monday to Thursday from 11:30 AM to 9 PM, Friday and Saturday from 11:30 AM to 10 PM, Sunday from 11:30 AM to 8 PM

(305) 892-2812

——Here’s Something Completely Different: ——

Meet The Three Frenchmen Who Are Taking Over Miami’s Culinary Scene

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Meet The Three Frenchmen Who Are Taking Over Miami’s Culinary Scene

What’s News In This Story?


 

–All the rage in North Miami is Cafe Creme, a French restaurant that serves breakfast, lunch and dinner. It’s the kind of place that you wouldn’t dream to find in this working class Miami suburb a few years ago.

-Cafe Creme co-founder Cory Finot and his partner Claude Postel were lured to North Miami by some grant money from the city’s community redevelopment agency.

-While additional future locations for Cafe Creme are in development, the three Frenchmen have embarked on another ambitious venture. 

-In mid 2018, they opened Sixty10, an old school place that serves classic French chicken dishes in a unpretentious way. 

-Claude owns the land it sits on in the heart of Little Haiti and the Frenchmen are betting that it becomes the Wynwood Walls of the neighborhood as it continues to experience gentrification. 

-If you think that sounds like a pipe dream, don’t be so hasty. Cory was mentored by the man who put Wynwood on the map, the late Miami developer Tony Goldman. 

 **IF YOU GO: 

Cafe Creme, North Miami- 750 NE 125th St, North Miami, FL 33161

Cafe Creme, Buena Vista- 5010 NE 2nd Ave, Miami, Fl 33137

Sixty10- 6010 NE 2nd Ave, Miami, FL 33137

——Here’s Something Completely Different: ——

Newly Reopened To The Public, Miami’s Iconic Freedom Tower Has Positioned Itself As An Ideas Hub

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Haitian Radio Host Called A Race Baiter By NoMi Councilman, After Controversial Rant The City May Have Paid For

What’s News In This Story?


–North Miami Councilman Scott Galvin called popular Haitian radio host Rotschill Anderson a race baiter after the media personality went on a controversial on-air racial rant. 

-Galvin claims that the city has paid Anderson in the past to allow North Miami staff to promote the city on air. Galvin also said that it was his understanding that the city had paid for a May 1 appearance by Assistant City Manager Arthur H. Sorey III.

-Sorey was on the show to encourage residents to vote for a $120 million bond measure. But he also sat through a rant from Anderson that some found to be racist.

-Anderson strongly supported the bond and asked his listeners to vote for it because he felt it would improve the city’s heavily Haitian western section. 

-But it was the language that Anderson used that has gotten attention: “The big white guy, the big jewish guy- they are going to come into your community, says that your community is ugly and its nasty… gentrification will kick in.” 

-A quick public records search finds that North Miami has paid Anderson’s radio station at least $1,800 so far in 2018 for “public relations.” 

-But city manager Larry Spring told RISE NEWS that Galvin is wrong and that the city did not pay Anderson for the May 1 show.

-The city council has temporally suspended all payments to media outlets until they can craft a new policy to prevent a future incident. 

——Here’s Something Completely Different: ——

There’s A Secret Buddhist Temple In This El Portal House

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He’s Forced To Collect Quarters From Aldi’s Shopping Carts To Keep From Being Homeless

UPDATED- July 10, 2018

What’s News In This Story?


 

Update:

Many have asked for an update about Shane Rasche. Three months after our story, Shane has still been unable to find a full time job. He says he’s tried everything- even going to an job agency but nothing has worked. But thanks to RISE NEWS readers who reached out after watching his story, Shane was able to pick up some part time work cleaning a yard. The same family who gave him the part time gig also took him out to dinner one night. His landlord has been very understanding and has allowed him to stay in his North Miami apartment despite the fact that he owes thousands in unpaid rent. Finally, late last month, Shane received his first Social Security check for around $1,200. It isn’t much- especially with all that he owes, but he is able to survive on it. At 62, Shane says that he still wants to work and give more to society. He also said that he would gladly take a job if one was offered to him. Until he is able to pay off his debts, he will still be in the Aldi’s parking lot collecting quarters. If you would like to help Shane, we can put you in touch with him by emailing us at editor@risenews.net.

Original Story:

-Shane Rasche has lived and woked in North Miami for nearly 50 years.

-All that time, he’s paid taxes and been a productive member of the community.

-But after the K-Mart that he worked at for nearly a decade closed last year, he’s been unable to find a job.

-Now, only a few months before he recieves his first Social Security check (and some financial safety), he is about to be evicted from his apartment.

-He’s been forced to collect quarters in the parking lot of an Aldi’s on Biscayne Boulevard (1290 NE 108th St, Miami, FL 33161) so he can feed himself.

-If you have a way to help Shane you can email: editor@risenews.net. 

Watch Another Story: Meet Miami’s Queen Bee And Her Backyard Insect Revolution

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Have a news tip about this topic or something completely different? Send it on in to editor@risenews.net.

“Shame On You FIU” March Takes North Miami By Storm

What’s News In This Story?


-Over a hundred protestors marched east on 135th St in North Miami to demand that FIU not build a road through the Arch Creek East Environment Preserve. 

-The city has opposed the plan to connect 135th St to the backside of the FIU North Campus for years because they say it would damage the preserve.

-North Miami Councilman Scott Galvin said that the city is preparing to sue in order to stop the project from going through. 

 

Watch Another Story: Meet Miami’s Queen Bee And Her Backyard Insect Revolution

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Have a news tip about this topic or something completely different? Send it on in to editor@risenews.net.

 

The Future Of Haitian Food Is Being Crafted In This North Miami Office Building

 

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North Miami’s Enchanted Place Is South Florida’s Best Kept Holiday Secret

What’s News With This Story: 

–Enchanted Place is one of South Florida’s most unique community traditions. 

-A group of around 30 houses on North Miami’s NE 137th Terrace go all out each December by putting up thousands of lights and holiday decorations. 

-Tens of thousands of people travel from around the area to drive down the street and take a picture with Santa Claus. 

-The tradition started in the late 1980s as a neighborly rivalry between Ken DiGenova and a few of his friends. It quickly grew to the entire street and has lasted 29 years. 

-DiGenova puts many of the lights up himself and he organizes the effort each year. 

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WATCH: 

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If You Go: 

Location: 1600 NE 137th Terrace, North Miami

Time: Sunset to 11:00 PM

Cost: Free (Voluntary donations to a local charity are collected if you want to give) 

-Santa Claus will be on the street to take pictures every night until Christmas. 

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RISE NEWS is South Florida’s digital news magazine. Follow us on Facebook to make sure you never miss a story!

Have a news tip about this topic or something completely different? Send it on in to editor@risenews.net.

WATCH ANOTHER STORY: The World’s Greatest Sign Spinners Live In South Florida. Seriously. 

 

North Miami Residents Fume Over Trash Pickup Company’s “Garbage Job”

What’s New With This Story: 

-Large numbers of North Miami residents are sick of Waste Pro, the private company that has served as the city’s garbage collector for over six years.

-Some residents are willing to pay more in taxes in order for the trash pickup to go back to city management. Trash pickup services were privatized in 2011.

-North Miami Councilman Scott Galvin organized an event in early September for residents to vent their frustrations with the company. The regional VP for Waste Pro, Russell Mackie showed up to the event as well.

-Mackie said that Waste Pro has contracts with 21 South Florida municipalities and that the company has never lost a contract due to poor service. Instead he blames the problems on a poorly designed contract that North Miami has been slow to amend.

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In North Miami, residents say that the garbage trucks are still rolling on the streets as late at 10:30 PM some nights.

Trash pickup can be spotty according to others and a lack of quality service has put a bad taste in the mouths of many.

The situation has become so bad that there are residents willing to do something truly drastic- pay more in taxes to fix the problem.

Judy Brown, the president of the Sunkist Grove Homeowners Association said that she would be willing to do just that.

Read More: INSIDE: The Shocking Conditions That Condemned The Miami Shores Motel

She has lived in North Miami for 38 years and has seen the quality of trash pickup over the decades first hand.

“As soon as it became privatized, I noticed a difference and I started getting complaints,” Brown said. “Because, I’m the homeowner president, they would call me and complain about the trash not being collected.”

Brown said that the real problems started around 2013 when the bulk pickup stopped getting picked up.

She said things were better when the city was in charge of trash pickup.

“They took pride in what they were doing,” Brown said of the city workers who used to operate the service.

She said they would be done by 7 AM. With Waste Pro, she’s heard of trucks still picking up trash at 10:30 PM.

Michael McDearmaid has lived in NoMi for 50 years.

“When it was a city service, there was much more service,” McDearmaid said. “A lot of that had to do with the fact that they were employees of the city. A lot of them lived in the city.”

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He said that the workers would look out for residents, even calling the police if they felt that certain things were amiss.

“Ultimately in a city of this size, service is everything,” McDearmaid said.

He said that if Waste Pro came up with the best offer, then they should be given another chance and that privatization efforts around the country have been a “mixed bag”.

According to city manager Larry Spring, it would cost roughly $20 to $25 million to restart a city trash program.

City Councilman Scott Galvin said that he doesn’t think its likely for the city to do trash service in house again but he might be willing to support such an effort.

So why are things not working out with Waste Pro?

It all comes down to the contract that was signed in 2011.

“What they need to understand is it’s not an unhappiness with Waste Pro,” Russell Mackie the Regional Vice President for Waste Pro Florida said. “Waste Pro sort of by default gets blamed for that. But there’s a deficiency in the contract.”

Under the original contract, Waste Pro was only supposed to collect bulk pick up once per month.

But after residents complained, the company agreed to do it once per week according to Mackie.

But Mackie said that the company wasn’t paid extra for the additional service.

Read More: This Johnson & Wales Student Wants To Fundamentality Alter The Way You Look At Snack Food

In addition to that, the amount of trash picked up at the curb has increased 30% and the landfill has raised its prices 15%.

The contract officially ended in May but service was continued under an overtime provision until August.

Waste Pro continues to service North Miami basically without a contract in a bonus time arrangement.

An opening biding process for a new contract will be sent out to all interested companies.

Waste Pro intends to apply again.

RISE NEWS is South Florida’s digital news magazine. Follow us on Facebook to make sure you never miss a story!

Have a news tip about this topic or something completely different? Send it on in to editor@risenews.net.

Watch: Senator Tried To Use Connection To FPL Lobbyist To Get Power On For Her Family Post Irma 

Personal Drama Splits North Miami Night Market Into Two Different Organizations

What’s New With This Story: 

-The NoMi Night Market has split into two separate market operations after the co-founders split after a personal squabble.

-The newly named Urban Habitat Night Market [led by Howard Tonkin] will continue to take place Friday nights at a property located near the intersection of NE 123rd St and NE 13th Ave

-The NoMi Night Market [led by Laura Hill] vows to relaunch in the future, but is currently looking to secure a permanent space.

-Hill and Tonkin had worked together to bring North Miami’s first night market into being and it opened to a nice amount of support from the community on Nov. 3.

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Personal differences have split a promising North Miami happening into two, only a few days after it officially started.

The NoMi Night Market is now the Urban Habitat Night Market or just a night market that happens at Urban Habitat, depending on who you ask.

And the NoMi Night Market is not dead, just looking to continue on at a different venue, depending on who you ask.

So yeah.

RISE NEWS attended the first weekly NoMi Night Market when it debuted on Nov. 3.

There were around 10 vendors and a smattering of local residents who popped in to sample various organic and sustainable products.

We even did a video on the opening:

But in the days following that opening, the co-founders split into two competing organizations.

As a result, North Miami may end up with two separate night markets.

What caused the split is based on who you believe.

Laura Hill and Howard Tonkin were the co-founders.

Hill is a North Miami activist and organizer, and Tonkin runs Urban Habitat, a sustainable landscaping business.

They both agree that they worked together to launch a night market at Tonkin’s new Urban Habitat property in North Miami.

But that’s about all they seem to agree on.

The biggest sticking point?

Just who came up with the idea in the first place.

Tonkin told RISE NEWS that the night market has been a dream of his for years, dating back to his time in Australia when he would visit the Mindil Beach night market.

He said that he’s wanted to bring the concept to Miami for years and that it is part of his overall long-term strategy for Urban Habitat.

“It’s my dream to bring people into my market,” Tonkin said. “It’s exciting to bring people into the market at night. That’s when the plants come alive.”

But Hill said that she came up with the idea.

“I’ve been around [Tonkin] for four years and I haven’t really heard him talk about the night market,” Hill said. “NoMi Night Market was the market we were bringing to that space. I brought the market together. Everything.”

What actually tore them apart is unclear as they each have wildly different versions.

“His vision and his methods made it clear to me that we had to rethink the market,” Hill said of Tonkin. “I’ve spent hundreds and hundreds of hours putting the thing together. He’s very upset with me because I decided to part ways. Our philosophies of running a business are just different.”

Tonkin said that he felt that Hill was trying to “sabotage my business and take the idea and run with it on [her] own.”

No matter what caused the split, it could actually end up benefiting North Miami in the long run.

Now, the city and surrounding communities will have two night markets to choose from.

The Urban Habitat Night Market will take place every Friday near the intersection of NE 123rd St and NE 13th Ave.

The NoMi Night Market is looking to secure a space but plans to open in the near future.

RISE NEWS is South Florida’s digital news magazine. Follow us on Facebook to make sure you never miss a story!

Have a news tip about this topic or something completely different? Send it on in to editor@risenews.net.

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This Johnson & Wales Student Wants To Fundamentality Alter The Way You Look At Snack Food

Davian Watson is crazy for flavored nuts.

Well, actually he’s loko about them.

A junior at Johnson & Wales University in North Miami, Watson is also the founder and CEO of Loko Nutz.

He’s a constant presence at local farmers markets and is hustling to get his unique product out to the masses.

A Kansas City, MO native, Watson says that Loko Nutz was created out of boredom for his usual go-to snacks.

We recently spoke to Watson about his company and what it’s like to be a young entrepreneur in the Magic City.

RISE NEWS: How would you explain what Loko Nutz is to someone who has never heard of them before? 

Watson: Loko Nutz are outrageously flavored nuts designed to help families and friends live a little through snacking guilt-free. The recipes originated from a combination of my Kansas City culture and newly developed pallet for Miami cuisine. I also use customer feedback to create new outlandish flavors via Facebook and in-person suggestions at my farmer’s market booth.

RISE NEWS: What have you learned from starting a business?

Starting a business has taught me the importance of maintaining an organized schedule in my personal and professional life so that Loko Nutz can develop and expand. It is my responsibility to ensure that I am performing well in school and at work as a student assistant for a high volume department so that my business will continue to grow.

RISE NEWS: What are the biggest challenges with your business?

Currently, my biggest challenge is my lack of knowledge about the business world. I want to already be at the top of the small business owner market, for everyone to know about the Loko Nutz brand, and to instinctively think Loko Nutz whenever a snack craving rises—but I know it takes years of hard work and dedication to become a household name. Therefore, I guess you can say that my second challenge is my lack of patience.

RISE NEWS: Is it hard starting your own company as a young person?

Starting your own company at any age presents its own unique set of challenges; but with determination, ambition, and the right support system, I have found myself reaching new heights and learning new information every day!

RISE NEWS: How are your sales? How are you getting your products out to the public?

I am overwhelmed at the positive responses I have received from the Upper Eastside Farmers Market, my peers, and chefs here at Johnson & Wales University. Currently, I am working on the anticipated December launch of my online store, www.lokonutz.com, and expanding my social media presence. I currently sell at Upper Eastside farmers markets located at Legion Park on Saturdays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

RISE NEWS: What does your family think about you starting your own business?

My family have been my biggest supporters and advisors. They believe with hard work and persistence anything is possible. It seems they cannot get enough of Loko Nutz!

RISE NEWS: Do you have any friends who help with it or is it all just you at this point?

I have a dedicated group of friends that are my go-to people whenever I am testing out a new flavor that will potentially join the Loko Nutz menu. Fortunately, I already know that no business gets to the top on their own and I am extremely grateful to those who have taken time out of their day to give feedback on packaging ideas, tasting new flavors, and even driving to the Upper Eastside Farmer’s Market to purchase one, two or three bags of Loko Nutz.

RISE NEWS is South Florida’s digital news magazine. Follow us on Facebook to make sure you never miss a story!

Have a news tip about this topic or something completely different? Send it on in to editor@risenews.net.

Watch More: Miami’s Secret Tequesta Burial Mound 

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